Mexico City Santa Fe Area, Mexico City

Located in the west side of Mexico City in the route to Toluca and within boroughs Cuajimalpa and Alvaro Obregon is Santa Fe. The newest business district of the city started to be developed in the 80´s through a master plan that still is gradually c

Located in the west side of Mexico City in the route to Toluca and within boroughs Cuajimalpa and Alvaro Obregon is Santa Fe. The newest business district of the city started to be developed in the 80´s through a master plan that still is gradually carried out.

Reforma and Constituyentes Avenues give access to this zone that borders west with the limits of Hidalgo and Mexico states, south with the borough of Magdalena Contreras, and east and north with boroughs Benito Juarez, Coyoacan, and Miguel Hidalgo.

The largest shopping mall in Latinamerica is located in Santa Fe and due to its size end exclusiveness is worth visiting, indeed.

Once sand mines with a garbage dump nearby, this zone was projected to become a model of urban grow that included business, housing, schools, and other sectors.

Private investment was gradually attracted and in less than 10 years Santa Fe became one of the most exclusive and avant-garde zones in the country and in Latin America.

Several Mexican and transnational companies have found in Santa Fe the ideal surroundings to establish their headquarters. Besides, the construction of the largest shopping mall in Latin America helped to attract companies, visitors, and inhabitants to reside in the area. It is estimated that about 8 million people visit Santa Fe shopping mall yearly. Besides, more than 70,00 persons are employed in the area.

Santa Fe is also the location of 3 major colleges which give access to higher education to more than 13,000 students.

The last stage of Santa Fe integral and development plan is in its way. It includes the building of more offices and apartments under the direction of prestigious architects. More and more buildings with at least 45 stories can be seen in the horizon.

Santa Fe has not been, though, an attraction pole for entertainment or nightlife activities.

Criticism to this development is present mainly due to the lack of infrastructure such as adequate avenues to communicate the district to other zones of the city.

Moreover, families rather live in more traditional areas such as Polanco and Condesa because of the offer of services that they find there.